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Early Filipinos

|Philippine CultureCommon Fam | |ily Traits | |Filipinos highly value the presence of their families more than anything. Regardless of the liberal influence they have gotten | |from the west, the family remained the basic unit of their society. This trait clearly shows among Filipinos abroad who suffer | |homesickness and tough work just to support their families back home in the Philippines. | | |In a traditional Filipino family, the father is considered the head and the provider of the family while the mother takes | |responsibility of the domestic needs and in charge of the emotional growth and values formation of the children. They both | |perform different tasks and being remarked separately by the children. Children see their mothers soft and calm, while they | |regard their fathers as strong and the most eminent figure in the family. | | |Because of this remarkable closeness, parents sometimes have difficulties letting go of their children and thus results to | |having them stay for as long as they want. For this somehow explains why grandparents are commonly seen living with their | |children in the Philippines. Unlike the way people grow old in the west where they are provided with outside homes and care | |giving, Filipino elderly enjoy their remaining lives inside their houses with their children and grandchildren looking after | |them. | | |Another trait Filipinos made themselves exceptional from others is their strong respect for elders. Children are taught from | |birth how to say “po” and “opo” to teach them as early as possible how to properly respect their elders. These words are used to| |show respect to people of older level.

Even adults will be criticized for not using these words when speaking with their parents| |or people older than them. Inside the family, the parents are expected to receive the highest respect from the children along | |with the elder siblings; as they are given more responsibilities to look after younger siblings when parents are not around. | | | |Children fighting back or addressing parents or elder siblings with arrogant tone are not at all tolerated. They are also not | |allowed to leave the house without their parents’ permission.

Upon arriving home, conservative families expect children to | |practice the kissing of hands or placing their parents or elder family members’ hand to their foreheads with the words “mano po”| |as a sort of greeting. | | | |Even after finishing school, Filipino children are not obliged to get out of their homes unless they want to. In fact, most of | |them keep their close relationship to their parents by staying at least before they get married.

Leaving them happens only when | |they really have to, but usually, at least one child, depending on his willingness and financial capabilities, stay even after | |marriage to support and look after their aging parents. | | | |More over, Filipinos keep close connection with other relatives. They recognize them from 2nd degree to the last they can | |identify. As Filipinos say, “not being able to know a relative is like turning their backs from where they come from. ” | Spanish Influence on Filipino Food Filipino Food

Philippine cuisine has numerous indigenous and foreign influences. Throughout the centuries, the islands have incorporated the cuisine of the early Malay settlers, Arab and Chinese traders, and Spanish and American colonizers, along with other Oriental and Occidental accents and flavors. The strongest culinary influence is from Spain which ruled the Philippines for almost 400 years. Food historians claim that 80 per cent of Philippine dishes are of Spanish origin. Because the Spaniards formed the elite, dishes adapted by upper-class Filipinos were also Spanish-inspired.

Thus many of the party and fiesta dishes and those served for special occasions bear names like relleno, morcon, paella, callos, embutido, caldereta, etc. Chinese influence is evident in noodle dishes (bihon, miki, sotanghon, mami, lomi, miswa) which go by the general name of pancit. Noodle restaurants are called panciterias (another Spanish derivation), a term that usually refers to a Chinese eatery. Pancit Canton is a favorite of Filipinos when ordering Chinese food, along with lumpia shanghai (small spring rolls filled with minced meat and dipped in sweet sauce).

Even Chinese dishes have Hispanicized names – morisqueta tostada is Yangzhou fried rice, torta de cangrejo is crab omelet, camaron rebozado is shrimp fried in batter. Pancit Molo, an adaptation of wonton soup, is a specialty of the town of Molo in Iloilo. Pancit luglog, pancit malabon, pancit palabok are all variations upon the noodle theme. The difference lies in the type of noodle used and the garnishing and flavorings. Arroz caldo – rice porridge with slices of chicken meat garnished with chopped spring onions, or goto – rice porridge with tripe – are the local version of Chinese congee.

A less glamorous name for it is lugaw. This is a dish which can be ordered in fast-food shops or carinderias and is popular with people on a budget. Siopao is a steamed bun filled with meat which is usually ordered with pancit mami-noodles in soup-to make a filling snack or meal. Chinese sweets popular among Filipinos include hopia- flaky pastry with fillings of mashed red or green beans. lotus seed and the like. In Chinatown, small shops sell boxes of piping-hot hopia in the afternoons.

Unlike their Southeast Asian neighbors, most Filipinos do not eat chili-hot dishes, although dishes from the Bicol region are distinguished by their use of chili and coconut milk, similar to Indonesian, Malay and Thai food. ‘Bicol Express’ is a fiery dish of pork strips sauteed in garlic, onions, ginger and turmeric, mixed with bagoong alamang (salted and fermented shrimp sauce), coconut cream, chopped chilies and hot green and red peppers. Muslim food retains the flavor of its Malaysian origin. It is spicy and uses coconut milk, chilies, cassava and rice.

Many Philippine desserts, particularly those made of rice and coconut are similar to those of Indonesia and Malaysia. Among these are biko and suman, sticky rice cooked with coconut milk and sugar and wrapped in banana or pandan leaves, bibinka, puto and kutsinta which are different types of rice cakes, and bukayo, a crunchy sweet made of grated coconut cooked in molasses and pressed into bars. Filipino cooking like other Oriental preparations, involves a lot of chopping and labor-intensive preparation. Rice is the main staple, corn is a substitute in other places.

Filipinos prefer to have the entire meal laid out on the table when they eat, rather than have the dishes served one by one. This results in some food being served long after it is piping hot. Filipinos eat with forks and spoons, but in rural areas some people prefer to eat with their hands. Patis and bagoong, fermented fish or shrimp sauce, similar to those produced by Vietnamese and Thais, are used to flavor food when cooking and are served as sauces for a variety of dishes such as kare-kare or appetizers such as chopped green mangoes. The name of a dish often suggest how it’s prepared.

Prito means fried; gisa, ginisa or gisado means sauteed. Ihaw or inihaw means grilled or broiled. Adobo is to saute in vinegar and garlic. Paksiw means to stew in sour fruit or vinegar, ginataan is anything cooked in coconut milk (gata). Sinigang is like bouillabaisse, but thinner in consistency, and used either fish, prawns or meat with vegetable. It is usually made sour by adding some acidic fruit like tamarind or small green kamias. Much of the fun of visiting another country is trying out its cuisine and sampling regional specialties. Be bold!

Worth trying is adobo, a dish showing Spanish and Mexican influences but with regional variations. Pork, or a combination of pork and chicken, is stewed in a mixture of vinegar, bay leaf, peppercorn and garlic over a slow fire. Some vegetables and seafood are also cooked adobo-style. Lechon, pig roasted on a spit, is a fiesta favorite The crisp and succulent skin is eaten with a sweetish sauce of liver paste. Kare-kare, mainly oxtail and eggplants with other vegetables stewed in rich sauce or ground peanut and toasted ground rice is also found in many Filipino restaurant menus.

Bistek Pilipino is thin slices of beef marinated in soy sauce and lemon juice and cooked with plenty of onions. Tinola is chicken stew. With all the water around the Philippines, fish and seafood are plentiful and fresh. Bangus (milkfish), lapu-lapu (garoupa or grouper), tanguingue and blue marlin are excellent fish. Try the latter grilled with a squeeze of lemon or calamansi. Maliputo is a tiny freshwater fish with a delicate taste. Seafood is a specialty in many Filipino restaurants. Hipon (shrimps), sugpo (prawns), lobsters, crayfish and crabs are served in a variety of ways, Sinigang na sugpo or sinigang na hipon are Filipino favorites.

The coconut crab called tatus has a rich, nutty flavor and the meat is succulent. The provinces of Pampanga, Iloilo and Negros are also well-known for their cuisine. Lumpia ubod (heart of palm) is an Ilonggo spring roll in a soft, crepe-like wrapper stuffed with fresh ubod as its main ingredient. Another regional dish is laing (pronounced lah-ing), a southern specialty of taro leaves simmered in coconut milk and chopped shrimp. Filipinos flavor their food with dipping sauces (sawsawan) according to individual taste. Bagoong, patis, vinegar, soy sauce, ketchup and chili sauce are usual sawsawan.

With a squeeze of calamansi in the soy sauce or patis, a touch of mustard, chili, or mince garlic in the vinegar, new flavor are created. Filipinos also like sour accompaniments to their food, such as chopped green mangoes mixed with shrimp bagoong, or pickled shredded papaya (achara). The merienda is an important Filipino culinary institution. the traditional merienda or mid-afternoon snack include bibingka and ginataan, halo-halo, pancit luglog and puto. The bibingka is a cake made of flour, eggs and coconut milk baked in a pan lined with wilted banana leaves that impart a faint fragrance.

Some bibingkas have a square of white cheese placed inside during the last minutes of baking and are topped with freshly grated coconut. Ginataan taken at merienda is a mixture of diced tubers such as gabi, ube and camote, sliced plantain, strips of breadfruit and some sago or tapioca all cooked together in thick coconut milk with sugar to taste. Bakeries are found all over the country. Some turn out excellent breads. European-style cakes and pastries. Hard rolls (pan de sal) are traditionally eaten for breakfast.

Ensaymadas, buttered sweet rolls with cheese topping, can be taken at breakfast or tea. Halo-halo (mix-mix) is a layered concoction of various ingredients – caramel custard, diced gelatin, candied or preserved jackfruit, makapuno or kaong – topped with shaved ice and milk. Sometimes a scoop of ice cream is added. Visitors can try Philippine food in a variety of settings from smart restaurants and hotel dining rooms to street stalls, fast-food shops and carinderias. Eating places that advertise ihaw-ihaw serve grilled or barbecued foods, principally meat or seafood.

The turo-turo (you point to what you want to order) system prevails in carinderias or small eateries serving precooked foods. If you happen to be in Metro Manila or the provinces when they hold their food festivals, this is a good opportunity to try the Philippines’ regional dishes. Philippine Wedding Culture and Superstitions From: http://www. weddingsatwork. com Filipinos still adhere to numerous widely-held folk beliefs that have no scientific or logical basis but maybe backed-up by some past experiences (yet can be dismissed as mere coincidence). Below are just a few that concerns weddings.

Some are still practiced to this day primarily because of ‘there’s nothing to lose if we comply’ attitude while the others are totally ignored for it seemed downright ridiculous. Read on… Brides shouldn’t try on her wedding dress before the wedding day or the wedding will not push through. Knives and other sharp and pointed objects are said to be a bad choice for wedding gifts for this will lead to a broken marriage. Giving arinola (chamberpot) as wedding gift is believed to bring good luck to newlyweds. Altar-bound couples are accident-prone and therefore must avoid long drives or traveling before their wedding day for safety.

The groom who sits ahead of his bride during the wedding ceremony will be a henpecked husband. If it rains during the wedding, it means prosperity and happiness for the newlyweds. – A flame extinguished on one of the wedding candles means the one on which side has the unlit candle, will die ahead of the other. Throwing rice confetti at the newlyweds will bring them prosperity all their life. The groom must arrive before the bride at the church to avoid bad luck. It is considered bad luck for two siblings to marry on the same year. Breaking something during the reception brings good luck to the newlyweds.

The bride should step on the groom’s foot while walking towards the altar if she wants him to agree to her every whim. A bride who wears pearls on her wedding will be an unhappy wife experiencing many heartaches and tears. An unmarried woman who follows the footsteps (literally) of the newlyweds will marry soon. Dropping the wedding ring, the veil or the arrhae during the ceremony spells unhappiness for the couple. In early Filipino custom, the groom-to-be threw his spear at the front steps of his intended’s home, a sign that she has been spoken for.

These days, a ring suffices as the symbol of engagement. The Engagement After the couple has decided to marry, the first order of business is the pamanhikan, where the groom and his parents visit the bride’s family to ask for her hand in marriage. Wedding plans are often made at this time, including a discussion of the budget and guest list. Don’t be surprised if the groom-to-be is expected to run some errands or help out around the bride’s house. This tradition is called paninilbihan, where the suitor renders service to his future wife’s family to gain their approval.

The Wedding Outfits The white wedding dress has become popular in the last hundred years or so with America’s influence in the Philippines. Before that, brides wore their best dress, in a festive color or even stylish black, to celebrate a wedding. Orange blossom bouquets and adornments were a must during the turn of the last century. For men, the barong tagalog is the traditional Filipino formal wear. It is a cool, almost transparent, embroidered shirt, made from silky pina or jusi, two native ecru fabrics. It is worn untucked, over black pants, with a white t-shirt underneath.

These days, a Filipino American groom might wear the conventional black tux, but Filipino male wedding guests will usually show up in their finest barongs. The Ceremony In pre-colonial days, a wedding ceremony lasted three days. On the first day, the bride and groom were brought to the house of a priest or babaylan, who joined their hands over a plate of raw rice and blessed the couple. On the third day, the priest pricked the chests of both bride and groom and drew a little blood. Joining their hands, they declared their love for each other three times.

The priest then fed them cooked rice from the same plate and gave them a drink of some of their blood mixed with water. Binding their hands and necks with a cord, he declared them married. The majority of Filipino weddings are now Catholic weddings, but some native traditions remain. Most have special “sponsors” who act as witnesses to the marriage. The principal sponsors could be godparents, counselors, a favorite uncle and aunt, even a parent. Secondary sponsors handle special parts of the ceremony, such as the candle, cord and veil ceremonies.

Candle sponsors light two candles, which the bride and groom use to light a single candle to symbolize the joining of the two families and to invoke the light of Christ in their married life. Veil sponsors place a white veil over the bride’s head and the groom’s shoulders, a symbol of two people clothed as one. Cord sponsors drape the yugal (a decorative silk cord) in a figure-eight shape–to symbolize everlasting fidelity–over the shoulders of the bride and groom. The groom gives the bride 13 coins, or arrhae, blessed by the priest, as a sign of his dedication to his wife’s well-being and the welfare of their future children.

The Food The Filipino wedding feast is elaborate. One feast celebrated at the turn of the last century involved these foods: First was served cold vermicelli soup. The soup was followed by meats of unlimited quantity–stewed goat, chicken minced with garlic, boiled ham, stuffed capon, roast pork and several kinds of fish. There were no salads, but plenty of relishes, including red peppers, olives, green mango pickles and crystallized fruits. For dessert, there were meringues, baked custard flan, coconut macaroons and sweetened seeds of the nipa plant. Superstitions and Beliefs Related to Death : 1.

If a black butterfly lingers around a person, it means that one of his relatives has just died. 2. No one should go out before the utensils used in eating have been washed and put away, otherwise a member of the family will die. 3. One must not organize teams of 3 or 13, otherwise one member will die. 4. Eating sour fruits at night will cause the early death of one’s parents. 5. At a funeral, not all members of the family should be allowed to look at the face of the dead person. If they do, he will visit them and all of them will die. 6. If a sick person on his way to the hospital meets a black cat, he will die. 7.

If someone smells the odor of a candle when there is no candle burning, one of his relatives will die. 8. If one dreams that one of his teeth is being uprooted or pulled out, a member of his family will die. 9. If a person eats “malunggay” (leaves of a Philippine tree used as a vegetable) when one member of his family has just died, all the other members of the family will die. 10. During a wedding the one whose candle goes out first will be the first of the couple to die. 11. If one cuts his fingernails at night, a member of the family will die. 12. When a group of three have their picture taken, the one in the middle will die first. 3. If a cock crows in the afternoon, it means somebody will die. 14. If an owl is seen near the house of a sick person, that sick person is sure to die. 15. Pregnant women should not have their picture taken; otherwise, their babies will die. 16. While the mother is giving birth, every hole in the house should be covered, otherwise an evil spirit might come in and kill the baby. 17. When a pregnant woman wears a black dress, her baby will die. 18. If a person’s shadow appears to be without a head, that person will soon die. 19. Cleaning the backyard when the sun has already set and it is already dark causes death. 0. If two people from the same family get married within a year, one will die. 21. If you place a dead person with his feet pointing toward the rising sun, a relative will die. |Philippine Fiestas and Holidays | |The fiesta is part and parcel of Filipino culture. Through good times and bad times, the fiesta must go on. Each city and barrio| |has at least one local festival of its own, usually on the feast of its patron saint, so that there is always a fiesta going on | |somewhere in the country.

But the biggest and most elaborate festival of all is Christmas, a season celebrated with all the pomp| |and pageantry the fun-loving Filipino can manage. | |ATI-ATIHAN | |Kalibo, Aklan | |13-19 January | |The Ati-Atihan Festival commemorates the 13th century land deal between 10 migrating Bornean chieftains and the aboriginal Ati | |King Marikudo.

It also honors the town patron, the infant Sto. Ni? o. | |The ceaseless, rhythmic pounding of drums get to you, and before you know it you are on the street, shuffling your feet, shaking| |your head, waving your hands – and joining thousands of soot-blacked, gaily-costumed revelers in an ancient ritual of mindless | |merriment. A familiar battle cry reaches your ears, and amidst all this confusion you remember where you are: Kalibo, Aklan. | |”Viva, Sto. Ni? o! | |The Ati-Atihan celebration is echoed in many parts of the country. | |SINULOG | |Cebu City | |18-19 January | | | |Cebu City’s fiesta of fiestas.

Characterized by its peculiar two-steps-forward-and-one-step-backward shuffle, thus simulating | |the Holy Child of the shores, the Sinulog is a century-old tradition observed in the part of Visayas region. The prayer-dance is| |synchronized to the beat of drums and shouts of “Pit Se? or! Viva Sto. Ni? o! ” Feel free to dance with the best of them, grooving | |all the way to the grand final presentation at the Cebu City Sports Center. |DINAGYANG | |Iloilo City | |25-26 January | |Merry mayhem breaks loose in Iloilo City during this weekend, when Ilonggos leave everything behind to join in the fiesta of the| |year. All inhibitions are dropped: boring everyday clothes are exchanged for “Ati” warrior costumes and black body paint. |Shields and “weapons” are held amidst the pounding rhythm of drums, the costumed Ilonggos put their best feet forward in | |celebration of….. Dinagyang! | |PANAGBENGA | |Baguio Flower Festival | |23 February – 3 March | |It’s flower season in the city of Pines – perfect timing for an all-out fiesta in the streets. The Baguio folk take a break on | |these days to revel in the cool climate and the unique culture of the city.

Multi-hued costumes are worn, mimicking the various | |blooms of the highland region (or any of its 11 ethnic tribes). These are flowerbeds – disguised, of course, as the Panagbenga | |parade floats. | |KAAMULAN | |Malaybalay, Bukidnon | |28 February – 1 March | |Expect the Bukidnon to go tribal from the first to the second week of March, when the streets of Malaybalay take on that | |familiar fiesta theme.

Banners, banderitas, and beer will be norm, as well as the sweet, haunting sound of native music. An | |early morning pamuhat ritual kicks off the festivities, to be followed by an ethnic food fest, trade fairs, and a lot of native | |dancing. The fiesta is part and parcel of Filipino culture. Through good times and bad times, the fiesta must go on. Each city | |and barrio has at least one local festival of its own, usually on the feast of its patron saint, so that there is always a | |fiesta going on somewhere in the country.

But the biggest and most elaborate festival of all is Christmas, a season celebrated | |with all the pomp and pageantry the fun-loving Filipino can manage. | |ATI-ATIHAN Kalibo, Aklan | |13-19 January | |The Ati-Atihan Festival commemorates the 13th century land deal between 10 migrating Bornean chieftains and the aboriginal Ati | |King Marikudo. It also honors the town patron, the infant Sto. Ni? o. |The ceaseless, rhythmic pounding of drums get to you, and before you know it you are on the street, shuffling your feet, shaking| |your head, waving your hands – and joining thousands of soot-blacked, gaily-costumed revelers in an ancient ritual of mindless | |merriment. A familiar battle cry reaches your ears, and amidst all this confusion you remember where you are: Kalibo, Aklan. | |”Viva, Sto. Ni? o! ” | |The Ati-Atihan celebration is echoed in many parts of the country. |SINULOG | |Cebu City | |18-19 January | |Cebu City’s fiesta of fiestas. Characterized by its peculiar two-steps-forward-and-one-step-backward shuffle, thus simulating | |the Holy Child of the shores, the Sinulog is a century-old tradition observed in the part of Visayas region. The prayer-dance is| |synchronized to the beat of drums and shouts of “Pit Se? r! Viva Sto. Ni? o! ” Feel free to dance with the best of them, grooving | |all the way to the grand final presentation at the Cebu City Sports Center. | |DINAGYANG | |Iloilo City | |25-26 January | |Merry mayhem breaks loose in Iloilo City during this weekend, when Ilonggos leave everything behind to join in the fiesta of the| |year.

All inhibitions are dropped: boring everyday clothes are exchanged for “Ati” warrior costumes and black body paint. | |Shields and “weapons” are held amidst the pounding rhythm of drums, the costumed Ilonggos put their best feet forward in | |celebration of….. Dinagyang! | |PANAGBENGA | |Baguio Flower Festival | |23 February – 3 March |It’s flower season in the city of Pines – perfect timing for an all-out fiesta in the streets. The Baguio folk take a break on | |these days to revel in the cool climate and the unique culture of the city. Multi-hued costumes are worn, mimicking the various | |blooms of the highland region (or any of its 11 ethnic tribes). These are flowerbeds – disguised, of course, as the Panagbenga | |parade floats. |KAAMULAN | |Malaybalay, Bukidnon | |28 February – 1 March | |The fiesta is part and parcel of Filipino culture. Through good times and bad times, the fiesta must go on. Each city and barrio| |has at least one local festival of its own, usually on the feast of its patron saint, so that there is always a fiesta going on | |somewhere in the country.

But the biggest and most elaborate festival of all is Christmas, a season celebrated with all the pomp| |and pageantry the fun-loving Filipino can manage. | |ATI-ATIHAN | |Kalibo, Aklan | |13-19 January | |The Ati-Atihan Festival commemorates the 13th century land deal between 10 migrating Bornean chieftains and the aboriginal Ati | |King Marikudo.

It also honors the town patron, the infant Sto. Ni? o. | |The ceaseless, rhythmic pounding of drums get to you, and before you know it you are on the street, shuffling your feet, shaking| |your head, waving your hands – and joining thousands of soot-blacked, gaily-costumed revelers in an ancient ritual of mindless | |merriment. A familiar battle cry reaches your ears, and amidst all this confusion you remember where you are: Kalibo, Aklan. | |”Viva, Sto. Ni? o! ” | |The Ati-Atihan celebration is echoed in many parts of the country. |SINULOG | |Cebu City | |18-19 January | |Cebu City’s fiesta of fiestas. Characterized by its peculiar two-steps-forward-and-one-step-backward shuffle, thus simulating | |the Holy Child of the shores, the Sinulog is a century-old tradition observed in the part of Visayas region. The prayer-dance is| |synchronized to the beat of drums and shouts of “Pit Se? or! Viva Sto. Ni? o! Feel free to dance with the best of them, grooving | |all the way to the grand final presentation at the Cebu City Sports Center. | |DINAGYANG | |Iloilo City | |25-26 January | |Merry mayhem breaks loose in Iloilo City during this weekend, when Ilonggos leave everything behind to join in the fiesta of the| |year.

All inhibitions are dropped: boring everyday clothes are exchanged for “Ati” warrior costumes and black body paint. | |Shields and “weapons” are held amidst the pounding rhythm of drums, the costumed Ilonggos put their best feet forward in | |celebration of….. Dinagyang! |PANAGBENGA | |Baguio Flower Festival | |23 February – 3 March | |It’s flower season in the city of Pines – perfect timing for an all-out fiesta in the streets. The Baguio folk take a break on | |these days to revel in the cool climate and the unique culture of the city. Multi-hued costumes are worn, mimicking the various | |blooms of the highland region (or any of its 11 ethnic tribes).

These are flowerbeds – disguised, of course, as the Panagbenga | |parade floats. | |KAAMULAN | |Malaybalay, Bukidnon | |28 February – 1 March | |Expect the Bukidnon to go tribal from the first to the second week of March, when the streets of Malaybalay take on that | |familiar fiesta theme.

Banners, banderitas, and beer will be norm, as well as the sweet, haunting sound of native music. An | |early morning pamuhat ritual kicks off the festivities, to be followed by an ethnic food fest, trade fairs, and a lot of native | |dancing. | |MORIONES | |Marinduque | |13-20 February | |The island of Marinduque prides itself in being the “Lenten Capital of the Philippines”, and it is easy to understand why.

Come | |the seven days of Holy Week, the people of the island take part in the age-old ritual of the “Moriones”. Colorful warrior | |costumes are worn, topped with finely carved masks depicting the fierce Roman soldiers of Christ’s time. All these are done to | |depict the story of the conversion of Longuinus, the centurion who pierced Jesus’ side – and his subsequent beheading. |CUTUD LENTEN RITES | |San Fernando, Pampanga | |16-18 April | |Prayer of a different meaning during the Lenten season, when villagers of San Pedro, Cutud, engage in the act of | |self-flagellation. This ancient ritual is performed in the morning of Good Friday during the Holy Week.

Backs, arms, and legs | |are cut and then struck with burillo whips. The climax to this occasion happens at midday, when penitents are literally nailed | |to their waiting crosses. | |PAHIYAS/MAYON/AGAWAN | |Quezon | |11-15 May | |Flowers come out in May, but these aren’t the only things flaunted during this merry month.

Down south in the town of Lucban, | |Quezon, there’s also the kiping – a colorful, translucent rice tortilla that serves as an edible ornament of sorts. You will see| |lots of these at the Pahiyas Festival, an annual celebration held to usher in a bountiful harvest, and smashing good times. | |It’s a free-for-all, grab-all-you-can affair with suman-sweet, sticky native rice cakes-as the center of contention. It is also | |the grand prize, so feel free to join the fray. Rest assured, whether you get handfuls or just a mere mouthful, the Mayohan sa | |Tayabas will leave you wanting for more – suman, of course! |Sariaya’s own version of the San Isidro festival showcases the creativity and ingenuity of the townsfolk in their craft and | |culinary tradition. | |FLORES DE MAYO / SANTACRUZAN | |Nationwide | |May | |A parade of the town’s loveliest ladies, depicting the search and discovery of Christ’s Cross by Queen Helena and Constantine. |MUDPACK FESTIVAL | |Murcia, Negros Occidental | |24 June | |Oneness with nature is the underlying theme behind Murcia’s annual mud-moving spectacle. Check on its murky highlight – a lively| |street dancing parade with the participant wearing nothing but mudpacks (well, almost… . It’s a surefire way to mix our | |ecological concerns with good, clean, cloddy fun – just be sure to shower afterwards! | |PINYAHAN SA DAET | |Daet, Camarines Norte | |15-24 June | |Sweet, succulent pineapple is the fruit of choice for the people of Daet, Camarines Norte. In fact, they loved it so much that | |they made a festival in its honor.

Join the locals as they celebrate the Pineapple Festival featuring a colorful street | |presentation complemented by art exhibits, trade fair, cultural dances, and sport events. Feel rich when you go for a visit at | |Paracale Gold Mines, and be acquainted with some Bicol heroes like Vinzon and Panganiban and Lucban. | |PARADA NG LECHON | |Balayan, Batangas | |24 June |A different sight and flavor are introduced in June with a festival in Balayan, Batangas, popularly known as the “Parada Ng | |Lechon”. These succulent roasted pork form the highlight of the occasion, decked out in their platforms with all kinds of d? cor. | |Since the festival coincides with the feast of St. John the Baptist, be prepared to get wet as people ob Expect the Bukidnon to | |go tribal from the first to the second week of March, when the streets of Malaybalay take on that familiar fiesta theme. | |Banners, banderitas, and beer will be norm, as well as the sweet, haunting sound of native music.

An early morning pamuhat | |ritual kicks off the festivities, to be followed by an ethnic food fest, trade fairs, and a lot of native dancing. | |MORIONES | |Marinduque | |13-20 February | |The island of Marinduque prides itself in being the “Lenten Capital of the Philippines”, and it is easy to understand why.

Come | |the seven days of Holy Week, the people of the island take part in the age-old ritual of the “Moriones”. Colorful warrior | |costumes are worn, topped with finely carved masks depicting the fierce Roman soldiers of Christ’s time. All these are done to | |depict the story of the conversion of Longuinus, the centurion who pierced Jesus’ side – and his subsequent beheading. |CUTUD LENTEN RITES | |San Fernando, Pampanga | |16-18 April | |Prayer of a different meaning during the Lenten season, when villagers of San Pedro, Cutud, engage in the act of | |self-flagellation. This ancient ritual is performed in the morning of Good Friday during the Holy Week.

Backs, arms, and legs | |are cut and then struck with burillo whips. The climax to this occasion happens at midday, when penitents are literally nailed | |to their waiting crosses. | |PAHIYAS/MAYON/AGAWAN | |Quezon | |11-15 May | |Flowers come out in May, but these aren’t the only things flaunted during this merry month. Down south in the town of Lucban, | |Quezon, there’s also the kiping – a colorful, translucent rice tortilla that serves as an edible ornament of sorts.

You will see| |lots of these at the Pahiyas Festival, an annual celebration held to usher in a bountiful harvest, and smashing good times. | |It’s a free-for-all, grab-all-you-can affair with suman-sweet, sticky native rice cakes-as the center of contention. It is also | |the grand prize, so feel free to join the fray. Rest assured, whether you get handfuls or just a mere mouthful, the Mayohan sa | |Tayabas will leave you wanting for more – suman, of course! |Sariaya’s own version of the San Isidro festival showcases the creativity and ingenuity of the townsfolk in their craft and | |culinary tradition. | |FLORES DE MAYO / SANTACRUZAN | |Nationwide | |May | |A parade of the town’s loveliest ladies, depicting the search and discovery of Christ’s Cross by Queen Helena and Constantine. |MUDPACK FESTIVAL | |Murcia, Negros Occidental | |24 June | |Oneness with nature is the underlying theme behind Murcia’s annual mud-moving spectacle. Check on its murky highlight – a lively| |street dancing parade with the participant wearing nothing but mudpacks (well, almost… . It’s a surefire way to mix our | |ecological concerns with good, clean, cloddy fun – just be sure to shower afterwards! | |PINYAHAN SA DAET | |Daet, Camarines Norte | |15-24 June | Sweet, succulent pineapple is the fruit of choice for the people of Daet, Camarines Norte. In fact, they loved it so much that | |they made a festival in its honor. Join the locals as they celebrate the Pineapple Festival featuring a colorful street | |presentation complemented by art exhibits, trade fair, cultural dances, and sport events. Feel rich when you go for a visit at | |Paracale Gold Mines, and be acquainted with some Bicol heroes like Vinzon and Panganiban and Lucban. |PARADA NG LECHON | |Balayan, Batangas | |24 June | |A different sight and flavor are introduced in June with a festival in Balayan, Batangas, popularly known as the “Parada Ng | |Lechon”. These succulent roasted pork form the highlight of the occasion, decked out in their platforms with all kinds of d? cor. | |Since the festival coincides with the feast of St.

John the Baptist, be prepared to get wet as people observe the feast by | |repeating the ritual of baptism – pouring water. | |TACLOBAN PINTADOS FESTIVAL | |Tacloban City | |29 June | |Back during pre-Hispanic years, tattoos signified courage among the natives of Tacloban. These days they symbolize a cultural | |revival, and a wild, wacky fiesta called the Pintados.

Join the town residents as they deck themselves out in body paint, | |mimicking the warriors of old while dancing to the frenetic beat of drums. | |SANDUGO FESTIVAL | |Tagbilaran City | |1-2 July | |The Spanish colonization of the Philippines began with a blood-sealed peace treaty on the shores of Bohol.

This historic event | |is remembered today with an all-out fiesta at the island’s capital city. Check out the Sandugo street dancing parade featuring | |ten colorfully-dressed groups dancing to the beat of drums. There’s also a traditional Filipino carnival, a martial arts | |festival, and Miss Bohol Sandugo Beauty Pageant, among the dozen of other exciting activities. |KINABAYO FESTIVAL | |Dapitan City | |25 July | |An exotic and colorful pageant re-enacting the Spanish-Moorish wars, particularly the Battle of Covadonga where the Spanish | |forces under General Pelagio took their last stand against Saracan. They were able to reverse the tide through the miraculous | |apparition of St.

James. The addition of local color and innovation has made this annual revelry a popular attraction which | |brings thousands of visitors to the city. | |KADAYAWAN SA DABAW | |Davao City | |20-24 August | |Davao’s annual festival, Kadayawan Sa Dadaw promises another weekend of fanfare and fun – tribal style.

Watch as the festivities| |reach a glorious climax on Saturday morning: that’s when the Kadayawan parade is held, featuring colorful, orchid-bedecked | |floats and more than a dozen “ethnic” groups dancing to the beat of wooden drums. | |BONOK-BONOK FESTIVAL & SILOP CAVE ADVENTURE | |Surigao City | |9 September | |Behind Surigao’s multi-faceted culture is its original tribal background.

The Surigaonons go back to their roots this month as | |they celebrate their heritage with a loud, rowdy street dancing parade. | |PE? AFRANCIA VIVA LA VIRGEN | |Naga City | |20 September | |Bicol Region’s biggest celebration is an annual affair that combines religion with culture and tradition, packing it all in a | |9-day fiesta of biblical proportions.

Stay until sundown for stirring climax: the fluvial parade as it makes its way down the | |river, surrounded by a sea of glowing candles – a fitting end of this truly spiritual occasion. | |ZAMBOANGA HERMOSA FESTIVAL | |Zamboanga City | |10-12 October | |All roads in Mindanao lead to Zamboanga, as the “City of Flowers” celebrates its grand, annual Hermosa Festival.

The vintas, | |those colorful native sea boats, once again make their appearance in a fast-paced, race-till-you-drop regatta. There’s also a | |wealth of cultural and flower shows, art exhibits, and trade fairs. It’s an all-out celebration of life – Chavacano style! |MASSKARA FESTIVAL | |Bacolod City | |14-21 October | |The carnival spirit fills the air as masked participants donning fabulous costumes dance there way around the city’s main | |thoroughfares. This annual event reflects Bacolenos’ love for fun and gaiety. Coinciding with the city’s character day | |celebration, the festival features carnivals, fairs, and madri-gras style street dancing. |LANZONES FESTIVAL | |Camiguin | |25-28 October | |Camiguin Island’s favorite fruit becomes the object of adoration in this superb street dancing extravaganza. Watch the streets | |of Mambajao become colorful, lively stages as the Camiguinons strut their stuff; dressed in the costumes of the Mindanao tribes,| |and carrying bunches of sweet, sumptuous lanzones.

Everyone is welcome to join the fun – it is a come-as-you-are, | |eat-all-you-can, and dance-till-you-can affair. | |PINTA FLORES FESTIVAL | |San Carlos City | |3-5 November | |This city in the sugar-producing island of Negros Occidental honors its patron saint, San Carlos Borromeo, with a pageant where | |participants with floral painted bodies dance in rhythmic beat as they wind through the major treets. The festival is inspired | |by the tattooed Negrenses of pre-colonial times. | |FEAST OF SAN CLEMENTE / HIGANTES | |Angono, Rizal | |23 November | |A fiesta of “gigantic” proportions, this one is highlighted by a grand procession featuring the higantes, ten-feet papier-m? che | |puppets, surrounded by a crowd of drenched, water-fighting revelers.

Better bring your squirt gun if you want to join the fun. | |It is a water-logged event that is sure to leave you wet n’ wild – and wanting for more. | |SHARIFF KABUNSUAN FESTIVAL | |Cotabato City | |15-19 December | |Cotabato City’s Moslem population celebrates the arrival of Islam to the region with a series of fun-filled activities.

No need | |to go native to enjoy these – there’s a fluvial parade, an outrigger boat race, as well as various musical and athletics events. | |GIANT LANTERN FESTIVAL | |San Fernando, Pampanga | |3 December | |San Fernando makes the biggest, most spectacular lanterns, at around 40 feet in diameter and bearing thousands of light bulbs a | |piece.

Watch them all in their twinkling, blinking, flashing glory in this grand Christmas exhibit. | |MORIONES | |Marinduque | |13-20 February | |The island of Marinduque prides itself in being the “Lenten Capital of the Philippines”, and it is easy to understand why.

Come | |the seven days of Holy Week, the people of the island take part in the age-old ritual of the “Moriones”. Colorful warrior | |costumes are worn, topped with finely carved masks depicting the fierce Roman soldiers of Christ’s time. All these are done to | |depict the story of the conversion of Longuinus, the centurion who pierced Jesus’ side – and his subsequent beheading. |CUTUD LENTEN RITES | |San Fernando, Pampanga | |16-18 April | |Prayer of a different meaning during the Lenten season, when villagers of San Pedro, Cutud, engage in the act of | |self-flagellation. This ancient ritual is performed in the morning of Good Friday during the Holy Week.

Backs, arms, and legs | |are cut and then struck with burillo whips. The climax to this occasion happens at midday, when penitents are literally nailed | |to their waiting crosses. | |PAHIYAS/MAYON/AGAWAN | |Quezon | |11-15 May | |Flowers come out in May, but these aren’t the only things flaunted during this merry month.

Down south in the town of Lucban, | |Quezon, there’s also the kiping – a colorful, translucent rice tortilla that serves as an edible ornament of sorts. You will see| |lots of these at the Pahiyas Festival, an annual celebration held to usher in a bountiful harvest, and smashing good times. | |It’s a free-for-all, grab-all-you-can affair with suman-sweet, sticky native rice cakes-as the center of contention. It is also | |the grand prize, so feel free to join the fray. Rest assured, whether you get handfuls or just a mere mouthful, the Mayohan sa | |Tayabas will leave you wanting for more – suman, of course! |Sariaya’s own version of the San Isidro festival showcases the creativity and ingenuity of the townsfolk in their craft and | |culinary tradition. | |FLORES DE MAYO / SANTACRUZAN | |Nationwide | |May | |A parade of the town’s loveliest ladies, depicting the search and discovery of Christ’s Cross by Queen Helena and Constantine. |MUDPACK FESTIVAL | |Murcia, Negros Occidental | |24 June | |Oneness with nature is the underlying theme behind Murcia’s annual mud-moving spectacle. Check on its murky highlight – a lively| |street dancing parade with the participant wearing nothing but mudpacks (well, almost… . It’s a surefire way to mix our | |ecological concerns with good, clean, cloddy fun – just be sure to shower afterwards! | |PINYAHAN SA DAET | |Daet, Camarines Norte | |15-24 June | |Sweet, succulent pineapple is the fruit of choice for the people of Daet, Camarines Norte.

In fact, they loved it so much that | |they made a festival in its honor. Join the locals as they celebrate the Pineapple Festival featuring a colorful street | |presentation complemented by art exhibits, trade fair, cultural dances, and sport events. Feel rich when you go for a visit at | |Paracale Gold Mines, and be acquainted with some Bicol heroes like Vinzon and Panganiban and Lucban. |PARADA NG LECHON | |Balayan, Batangas | |24 June | |A different sight and flavor are introduced in June with a festival in Balayan, Batangas, popularly known as the “Parada Ng | |Lechon”. These succulent roasted pork form the highlight of the occasion, decked out in their platforms with all kinds of d? cor. | |Since the festival coincides with the feast of St.

John the Baptist, be prepared to get wet as people observe the feast by | |repeating the ritual of baptism – pouring water. | |TACLOBAN PINTADOS FESTIVAL | |Tacloban City | |29 June | |Back during pre-Hispanic years, tattoos signified courage among the natives of Tacloban. These days they symbolize a cultural | |revival, and a wild, wacky fiesta called the Pintados.

Join the town residents as they deck themselves out in body paint, | |mimicking the warriors of old while dancing to the frenetic beat of drums. | |SANDUGO FESTIVAL | |Tagbilaran City | |1-2 July | |The Spanish colonization of the Philippines began with a blood-sealed peace treaty on the shores of Bohol.

This historic event | |is remembered today with an all-out fiesta at the island’s capital city. Check out the Sandugo street dancing parade featuring | |ten colorfully-dressed groups dancing to the beat of drums. There’s also a traditional Filipino carnival, a martial arts | |festival, and Miss Bohol Sandugo Beauty Pageant, among the dozen of other exciting activities. |KINABAYO FESTIVAL | |Dapitan City | |25 July | |An exotic and colorful pageant re-enacting the Spanish-Moorish wars, particularly the Battle of Covadonga where the Spanish | |forces under General Pelagio took their last stand against Saracan. They were able to reverse the tide through the miraculous | |apparition of St. James.

The addition of local color and innovation has made this annual revelry a popular attraction which | |brings thousands of visitors to the city. | |KADAYAWAN SA DABAW | |Davao City | |20-24 August | |Davao’s annual festival, Kadayawan Sa Dadaw promises another weekend of fanfare and fun – tribal style.

Watch as the festivities| |reach a glorious climax on Saturday morning: that’s when the Kadayawan parade is held, featuring colorful, orchid-bedecked | |floats and more than a dozen “ethnic” groups dancing to the beat of wooden drums. | |BONOK-BONOK FESTIVAL & SILOP CAVE ADVENTURE | Surigao City | |9 September | |Behind Surigao’s multi-faceted culture is its original tribal background. The Surigaonons go back to their roots this month as | |they celebrate their heritage with a loud, rowdy street dancing parade. PE?

AFRANCIA VIVA LA VIRGEN | |Naga City | |20 September | |Bicol Region’s biggest celebration is an annual affair that combines religion with culture and tradition, packing it all in a | |9-day fiesta of biblical proportions. Stay until sundown for stirring climax: the fluvial parade as it makes its way down the | |river, surrounded by a sea of glowing candles – a fitting end of this truly spiritual occasion. |ZAMBOANGA HERMOSA FESTIVAL | |Zamboanga City | |10-12 October | |All roads in Mindanao lead to Zamboanga, as the “City of Flowers” celebrates its grand, annual Hermosa Festival. The vintas, | |those colorful native sea boats, once again make their appearance in a fast-paced, race-till-you-drop regatta. There’s also a | |wealth of cultural and flower shows, art exhibits, and trade fairs.

It’s an all-out celebration of life – Chavacano style! | |MASSKARA FESTIVAL | |Bacolod City | |14-21 October | |The carnival spirit fills the air as masked participants donning fabulous costumes dance there way around the city’s main | |thoroughfares. This annual event reflects Bacolenos’ love for fun and gaiety. Coinciding with the city’s character day | |celebration, the festival features carnivals, fairs, and madri-gras style street dancing. |LANZONES FESTIVAL | |Camiguin | |25-28 October | |Camiguin Island’s favorite fruit becomes the object of adoration in this superb street dancing extravaganza. Watch the streets | |of Mambajao become colorful, lively stages as the Camiguinons strut their stuff; dressed in the costumes of the Mindanao tribes,| |and carrying bunches of sweet, sumptuous lanzones.

Everyone is welcome to join the fun – it is a come-as-you-are, | |eat-all-you-can, and dance-till-you-can affair. | |PINTA FLORES FESTIVAL | |San Carlos City | |3-5 November | |This city in the sugar-producing island of Negros Occidental honors its patron saint, San Carlos Borromeo, with a pageant where | |participants with floral painted bodies dance in rhythmic beat as they wind through the major streets.

The festival is inspired | |by the tattooed Negrenses of pre-colonial times. | |FEAST OF SAN CLEMENTE / HIGANTES | |Angono, Rizal | |23 November | |A fiesta of “gigantic” proportions, this one is highlighted by a grand procession featuring the higantes, ten-feet papier-m? che | |puppets, surrounded by a crowd of drenched, water-fighting revelers. Better bring your squirt gun if you want to join the fun. |It is a water-logged event that is sure to leave you wet n’ wild – and wanting for more. | |SHARIFF KABUNSUAN FESTIVAL | |Cotabato City | |15-19 December | |Cotabato City’s Moslem population celebrates the arrival of Islam to the region with a series of fun-filled activities. No need | |to go native to enjoy these – there’s a fluvial parade, an outrigger boat race, as well as various musical and athletics events. |GIANT LANTERN FESTIVAL | |San Fernando, Pampanga | |3 December | |San Fernando makes the biggest, most spectacular lanterns, at around 40 feet in diameter and bearing thousands of light bulbs a | |piece. Watch them all in their twinkling, blinking, flashing glory in this grand Christmas exhibit. | | |

The Creation Story When the world first began there was no land, but only the sea and the sky, and between them was a kite[1]. One day the bird which had nowhere to light grew tired of flying about, so she stirred up the sea until it threw its waters against the sky. The sky, in order to restrain the sea, showered upon it many islands until it could no longer rise, but ran back and forth. Then the sky ordered the kite to light on one of the islands to build her nest, and to leave the sea and the sky in peace.

Now at this time the land breeze and the sea breeze were married, and they had a child which was a bamboo. One day when this bamboo was floating about on the water, it struck the feet of the kite which was on the beach. The bird, angry that anything should strike it, pecked at the bamboo, and out of one section came a man and from the other a woman. Then the earthquake cal